Coronavirus Lockdown

During this period of self-isolation, you may wonder how you will cope? No fellowship, no meetings, reduced spiritual food whether for comfort, education or exhortation. What can you do? It can be lonely on your own and you may long for the company and encouragement of others.

We have collected a few links which you can access:

Uplook Ministries: http://uplook.tv/
Denver Gospel Hall: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn42Oz2OY9rXJCgYoadEDjA
Seek the Truth: www.seekthetruth.org.uk
Craig Munro: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRJE6BSE_X013k_yYOCacdA

You can also access these videos plus a whole lot of other helps such as Bible Reading Plans and recorded ministry by downloading the Precious Seed App which is available in both the Android and Apple Stores - follow the links below.

Apple store Google Play

If you are a believer, our prayer is that you will stay safe and be built up in your most holy faith at this difficult time. If you are not a believer, please take the situation seriously and realize that God may be speaking to you through these circumstances.

NB. Please note that we (Precious Seed) do not necessarily agree with everything that is said or believed by the speakers but we are happy to bring these links to you as we are sure that you will find some benefit and blessing from them.

Precious Seed striving to help you in your Christian life

We are a UK registered charity which, primarily, publishes a magazine to encourage the study of the scriptures, the practice of New Testament church principles and interest in gospel work in the UK and abroad. We hope you will find the content of these pages a help in your Christian life. We are constantly adding new content and features to our site, so please revisit periodically to check for updates.

Precious Seed - Volume 76 Issue 1 February 2021

Click here to view Issue 1 of 2021

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 8th May

BATHSHEBA

2 Samuel 11 and 12

Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam the Hittite and the wife of Uriah. She was a woman of outstanding beauty and was drawn into an adulterous relationship by David. David was at the peak of his achievement as king of Israel at this time (2 Sam. 10) and, arrogantly, seemed to think that nothing should be denied him. The sin brought particular sadness to Bathsheba; her husband was murdered and the child of the adulterous relationship died. Shame and family strife prophesied by Nathan brought distress to David and Bathsheba and had irreversible consequences for the nation and David’s family. 

Repentance is, in the first instance, an individual matter, but David’s repentance, as revealed in Psalm 51, appears to have been paralleled by that of Bathsheba. Corporate sin called for corporate repentance, and brought corporate forgiveness. God blessed them together in that they were saved from death and were later given a son, Solomon, who succeeded to David’s throne. Solomon was included in the line from which the Messiah came, although Bathsheba remains identified as, ‘her that had been the wife of Urias’, Matt. 1. 6. 

As David’s strength decreased there was further family intrigue in which Bathsheba was involved. Solomon was to succeed David, 1 Chron. 22. 9-10, but many of David’s followers opposed this. Assisted by Nathan the prophet, Bathsheba fearlessly confronted her husband and the courtiers who surrounded him, to thwart the plans of Adonijah to take the throne, 1 Kgs. 1. 18-21. Bathsheba later supported Adonijah’s request to marry Abishag. This caused further strife, and was seen by Solomon as an attempt to take the throne from him and he had Adonijah put to death. 

Glimpses of God’s grace brighten the record of the life of Bathsheba. As well as being the cause of his greatest failure, she was possibly the most influential of David’s wives. Jewish tradition asserts that Bathsheba is the ‘virtuous woman’ of Proverbs 31. 10-31. If this is so, in later life she became a worthy, highly regarded lady whose life reflected true repentance and an earnest desire to be a worthy follower of the God who had forgiven her. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 8th May

BATHSHEBA

2 Samuel 11 and 12

Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam the Hittite and the wife of Uriah. She was a woman of outstanding beauty and was drawn into an adulterous relationship by David. David was at the peak of his achievement as king of Israel at this time (2 Sam. 10) and, arrogantly, seemed to think that nothing should be denied him. The sin brought particular sadness to Bathsheba; her husband was murdered and the child of the adulterous relationship died. Shame and family strife prophesied by Nathan brought distress to David and Bathsheba and had irreversible consequences for the nation and David’s family. 

Repentance is, in the first instance, an individual matter, but David’s repentance, as revealed in Psalm 51, appears to have been paralleled by that of Bathsheba. Corporate sin called for corporate repentance, and brought corporate forgiveness. God blessed them together in that they were saved from death and were later given a son, Solomon, who succeeded to David’s throne. Solomon was included in the line from which the Messiah came, although Bathsheba remains identified as, ‘her that had been the wife of Urias’, Matt. 1. 6. 

As David’s strength decreased there was further family intrigue in which Bathsheba was involved. Solomon was to succeed David, 1 Chron. 22. 9-10, but many of David’s followers opposed this. Assisted by Nathan the prophet, Bathsheba fearlessly confronted her husband and the courtiers who surrounded him, to thwart the plans of Adonijah to take the throne, 1 Kgs. 1. 18-21. Bathsheba later supported Adonijah’s request to marry Abishag. This caused further strife, and was seen by Solomon as an attempt to take the throne from him and he had Adonijah put to death. 

Glimpses of God’s grace brighten the record of the life of Bathsheba. As well as being the cause of his greatest failure, she was possibly the most influential of David’s wives. Jewish tradition asserts that Bathsheba is the ‘virtuous woman’ of Proverbs 31. 10-31. If this is so, in later life she became a worthy, highly regarded lady whose life reflected true repentance and an earnest desire to be a worthy follower of the God who had forgiven her. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 8th May

BATHSHEBA

2 Samuel 11 and 12

Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam the Hittite and the wife of Uriah. She was a woman of outstanding beauty and was drawn into an adulterous relationship by David. David was at the peak of his achievement as king of Israel at this time (2 Sam. 10) and, arrogantly, seemed to think that nothing should be denied him. The sin brought particular sadness to Bathsheba; her husband was murdered and the child of the adulterous relationship died. Shame and family strife prophesied by Nathan brought distress to David and Bathsheba and had irreversible consequences for the nation and David’s family. 

Repentance is, in the first instance, an individual matter, but David’s repentance, as revealed in Psalm 51, appears to have been paralleled by that of Bathsheba. Corporate sin called for corporate repentance, and brought corporate forgiveness. God blessed them together in that they were saved from death and were later given a son, Solomon, who succeeded to David’s throne. Solomon was included in the line from which the Messiah came, although Bathsheba remains identified as, ‘her that had been the wife of Urias’, Matt. 1. 6. 

As David’s strength decreased there was further family intrigue in which Bathsheba was involved. Solomon was to succeed David, 1 Chron. 22. 9-10, but many of David’s followers opposed this. Assisted by Nathan the prophet, Bathsheba fearlessly confronted her husband and the courtiers who surrounded him, to thwart the plans of Adonijah to take the throne, 1 Kgs. 1. 18-21. Bathsheba later supported Adonijah’s request to marry Abishag. This caused further strife, and was seen by Solomon as an attempt to take the throne from him and he had Adonijah put to death. 

Glimpses of God’s grace brighten the record of the life of Bathsheba. As well as being the cause of his greatest failure, she was possibly the most influential of David’s wives. Jewish tradition asserts that Bathsheba is the ‘virtuous woman’ of Proverbs 31. 10-31. If this is so, in later life she became a worthy, highly regarded lady whose life reflected true repentance and an earnest desire to be a worthy follower of the God who had forgiven her. 

 

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