Coronavirus Lockdown

During this period of self-isolation, you may wonder how you will cope? No fellowship, no meetings, reduced spiritual food whether for comfort, education or exhortation. What can you do? It can be lonely on your own and you may long for the company and encouragement of others.

We have collected a few links which you can access:

Uplook Ministries: http://uplook.tv/
Denver Gospel Hall: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn42Oz2OY9rXJCgYoadEDjA
Seek the Truth: www.seekthetruth.org.uk
Craig Munro: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRJE6BSE_X013k_yYOCacdA

You can also access these videos plus a whole lot of other helps such as Bible Reading Plans and recorded ministry by downloading the Precious Seed App which is available in both the Android and Apple Stores - follow the links below.

Apple store Google Play

If you are a believer, our prayer is that you will stay safe and be built up in your most holy faith at this difficult time. If you are not a believer, please take the situation seriously and realize that God may be speaking to you through these circumstances.

NB. Please note that we (Precious Seed) do not necessarily agree with everything that is said or believed by the speakers but we are happy to bring these links to you as we are sure that you will find some benefit and blessing from them.

Precious Seed striving to help you in your Christian life

We are a UK registered charity which, primarily, publishes a magazine to encourage the study of the scriptures, the practice of New Testament church principles and interest in gospel work in the UK and abroad. We hope you will find the content of these pages a help in your Christian life. We are constantly adding new content and features to our site, so please revisit periodically to check for updates.

Precious Seed Volume 76 Issue 2 May 2021

Click here to view Issue 2 of 2021

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 26th July

JOB (2)

Job 1. 1-5

The prologue of the book of Job, chapters 1 and 2, along with the epilogue, 42. 7-17, is prose. The body of the book, chapters 3—42. 6, is largely poetry. The book commences with Job’s situation and makes four great statements regarding his fine character, 1. 1. 

(i) Perfect. Obviously not absolute or flawless perfection, as with the Lord Jesus, Heb. 4. 15, but Job was a man of integrity, sincerity and consistency in all areas of his life, Job 1. 8; 2. 3; 9. 21; cf. Gen. 6. 9; 17. 1. (ii) Upright. He not only refused evil, but deliberately chose good. (iii) One that feared God. The reason Job was ‘perfect and upright’ was that he feared God. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, Prov. 9. 10. This includes right thinking and proper conduct.  (iv) And eschewed evil. He shunned (abstained from) evil, because of his fear of the Lord, Prov. 8. 13; cf. 1 Thess. 5. 22. These statements concerning Job form the very foundation of the book. He was free from the obvious sins which were considered likely to bring down God’s wrath on offenders. One of the objects of the book is to teach that sufferings can be unconnected with sin. Therefore, Job’s excellent character is emphasized at the outset. The relative perfection of Job brings to mind the absolute perfection of the Lord Jesus. God in His wisdom caused Job to suffer, allowing Satan to afflict His servant. We marvel, even more, at the wonderful grace of God shown to us in allowing His own Son to defeat Satan when He suffered on our behalf, Heb. 2. 14-15. 

Job’s family and blessings were considerable; he was the greatest of all the men of the east, Job 1. 2-3. He was also a godly man, having concern for his family. When his children held birthday festivities, he would sanctify them. He presented burnt offerings (not associated with the Levitical system) on their behalf. Job did this as a precautionary measure in case his children, during their quite legitimate celebrations, should sin and curse God, 1. 4-5. Job was patriarchal priest for his family, appreciating there is no remission without blood sacrifice. Provision was made for his children, which was particular (the number of them). He gave God priority (early in the morning) and was persevering (continually), 1. 5. Here is a godly man from earliest times. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 26th July

JOB (2)

Job 1. 1-5

The prologue of the book of Job, chapters 1 and 2, along with the epilogue, 42. 7-17, is prose. The body of the book, chapters 3—42. 6, is largely poetry. The book commences with Job’s situation and makes four great statements regarding his fine character, 1. 1. 

(i) Perfect. Obviously not absolute or flawless perfection, as with the Lord Jesus, Heb. 4. 15, but Job was a man of integrity, sincerity and consistency in all areas of his life, Job 1. 8; 2. 3; 9. 21; cf. Gen. 6. 9; 17. 1. (ii) Upright. He not only refused evil, but deliberately chose good. (iii) One that feared God. The reason Job was ‘perfect and upright’ was that he feared God. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, Prov. 9. 10. This includes right thinking and proper conduct.  (iv) And eschewed evil. He shunned (abstained from) evil, because of his fear of the Lord, Prov. 8. 13; cf. 1 Thess. 5. 22. These statements concerning Job form the very foundation of the book. He was free from the obvious sins which were considered likely to bring down God’s wrath on offenders. One of the objects of the book is to teach that sufferings can be unconnected with sin. Therefore, Job’s excellent character is emphasized at the outset. The relative perfection of Job brings to mind the absolute perfection of the Lord Jesus. God in His wisdom caused Job to suffer, allowing Satan to afflict His servant. We marvel, even more, at the wonderful grace of God shown to us in allowing His own Son to defeat Satan when He suffered on our behalf, Heb. 2. 14-15. 

Job’s family and blessings were considerable; he was the greatest of all the men of the east, Job 1. 2-3. He was also a godly man, having concern for his family. When his children held birthday festivities, he would sanctify them. He presented burnt offerings (not associated with the Levitical system) on their behalf. Job did this as a precautionary measure in case his children, during their quite legitimate celebrations, should sin and curse God, 1. 4-5. Job was patriarchal priest for his family, appreciating there is no remission without blood sacrifice. Provision was made for his children, which was particular (the number of them). He gave God priority (early in the morning) and was persevering (continually), 1. 5. Here is a godly man from earliest times. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 26th July

JOB (2)

Job 1. 1-5

The prologue of the book of Job, chapters 1 and 2, along with the epilogue, 42. 7-17, is prose. The body of the book, chapters 3—42. 6, is largely poetry. The book commences with Job’s situation and makes four great statements regarding his fine character, 1. 1. 

(i) Perfect. Obviously not absolute or flawless perfection, as with the Lord Jesus, Heb. 4. 15, but Job was a man of integrity, sincerity and consistency in all areas of his life, Job 1. 8; 2. 3; 9. 21; cf. Gen. 6. 9; 17. 1. (ii) Upright. He not only refused evil, but deliberately chose good. (iii) One that feared God. The reason Job was ‘perfect and upright’ was that he feared God. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, Prov. 9. 10. This includes right thinking and proper conduct.  (iv) And eschewed evil. He shunned (abstained from) evil, because of his fear of the Lord, Prov. 8. 13; cf. 1 Thess. 5. 22. These statements concerning Job form the very foundation of the book. He was free from the obvious sins which were considered likely to bring down God’s wrath on offenders. One of the objects of the book is to teach that sufferings can be unconnected with sin. Therefore, Job’s excellent character is emphasized at the outset. The relative perfection of Job brings to mind the absolute perfection of the Lord Jesus. God in His wisdom caused Job to suffer, allowing Satan to afflict His servant. We marvel, even more, at the wonderful grace of God shown to us in allowing His own Son to defeat Satan when He suffered on our behalf, Heb. 2. 14-15. 

Job’s family and blessings were considerable; he was the greatest of all the men of the east, Job 1. 2-3. He was also a godly man, having concern for his family. When his children held birthday festivities, he would sanctify them. He presented burnt offerings (not associated with the Levitical system) on their behalf. Job did this as a precautionary measure in case his children, during their quite legitimate celebrations, should sin and curse God, 1. 4-5. Job was patriarchal priest for his family, appreciating there is no remission without blood sacrifice. Provision was made for his children, which was particular (the number of them). He gave God priority (early in the morning) and was persevering (continually), 1. 5. Here is a godly man from earliest times. 

 

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