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We are a UK registered charity which, primarily, publishes a magazine to encourage the study of the scriptures, the practice of New Testament church principles and interest in gospel work in the UK and abroad. We hope you will find the content of these pages a help in your Christian life. We are constantly adding new content and features to our site, so please revisit periodically to check for updates.

Precious Seed Volume 74 Issue 3 August 2019

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Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 20th October

HEROD ANTIPAS

Matthew 14. 1-14; Mark 6. 14-29; Luke 9. 7-9.

There are a number of kings in the New Testament called Herod. Herod the tetrarch was also known as Herod Antipas. He was the son of Herod the Great, and is the Herod most frequently mentioned in the New Testament. He ruled over Galilee for most of the time covered by the Gospel records. 

Herod had entered into an adulterous relationship with Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife. John the Baptist had fearlessly rebuked Herod for his immorality. The king would have killed him, Matt. 14 .5, and Herodias would also have killed him, Mark 6. 19, but this was not politically expedient, so the tyrant put him in prison to satisfy his rage and to remove his accuser from the public arena. 

On Herod’s birthday the dancing of the daughter of Herodias so pleased the king that he promised with an oath to grant whatever she wished. In collusion with her scheming mother, she asked for the head of the Baptist on a charger. Herod, sorry that he had spoken so inadvisedly, reluctantly granted the terrible request. He was caught in a trap and became the victim of an evil woman; a sensual man, he was influenced by a sensuous dance. Sometimes we are tested on what we say; we need always to use our lips wisely so that no one can manipulate our words and bring us into circumstances that we live to regret. 

His confusion was seen when he heard of the miracles of Christ, and was smitten with a bad conscience. He experienced a flashback to his dreadful deed. 

His craftiness was exposed when some Pharisees came to warn the Lord that the king was seeking His life; ‘Go . . . tell that fox’, was the Saviour’s reply, Luke 13. 32. 

His curiosity was unsatisfied when Pilate sent Jesus to Herod, ‘Desirous to see him of a long season . . . he hoped to see some miracle’, Luke 23. 8-9. 

His contempt for Christ was revealed when his men of war, ‘set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate’, Luke 23. 12. 

What a conspiracy of conciliation as, ‘Pilate and Herod were made friends together’; before they were at enmity! 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 20th October

HEROD ANTIPAS

Matthew 14. 1-14; Mark 6. 14-29; Luke 9. 7-9.

There are a number of kings in the New Testament called Herod. Herod the tetrarch was also known as Herod Antipas. He was the son of Herod the Great, and is the Herod most frequently mentioned in the New Testament. He ruled over Galilee for most of the time covered by the Gospel records. 

Herod had entered into an adulterous relationship with Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife. John the Baptist had fearlessly rebuked Herod for his immorality. The king would have killed him, Matt. 14 .5, and Herodias would also have killed him, Mark 6. 19, but this was not politically expedient, so the tyrant put him in prison to satisfy his rage and to remove his accuser from the public arena. 

On Herod’s birthday the dancing of the daughter of Herodias so pleased the king that he promised with an oath to grant whatever she wished. In collusion with her scheming mother, she asked for the head of the Baptist on a charger. Herod, sorry that he had spoken so inadvisedly, reluctantly granted the terrible request. He was caught in a trap and became the victim of an evil woman; a sensual man, he was influenced by a sensuous dance. Sometimes we are tested on what we say; we need always to use our lips wisely so that no one can manipulate our words and bring us into circumstances that we live to regret. 

His confusion was seen when he heard of the miracles of Christ, and was smitten with a bad conscience. He experienced a flashback to his dreadful deed. 

His craftiness was exposed when some Pharisees came to warn the Lord that the king was seeking His life; ‘Go . . . tell that fox’, was the Saviour’s reply, Luke 13. 32. 

His curiosity was unsatisfied when Pilate sent Jesus to Herod, ‘Desirous to see him of a long season . . . he hoped to see some miracle’, Luke 23. 8-9. 

His contempt for Christ was revealed when his men of war, ‘set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate’, Luke 23. 12. 

What a conspiracy of conciliation as, ‘Pilate and Herod were made friends together’; before they were at enmity! 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 20th October

HEROD ANTIPAS

Matthew 14. 1-14; Mark 6. 14-29; Luke 9. 7-9.

There are a number of kings in the New Testament called Herod. Herod the tetrarch was also known as Herod Antipas. He was the son of Herod the Great, and is the Herod most frequently mentioned in the New Testament. He ruled over Galilee for most of the time covered by the Gospel records. 

Herod had entered into an adulterous relationship with Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife. John the Baptist had fearlessly rebuked Herod for his immorality. The king would have killed him, Matt. 14 .5, and Herodias would also have killed him, Mark 6. 19, but this was not politically expedient, so the tyrant put him in prison to satisfy his rage and to remove his accuser from the public arena. 

On Herod’s birthday the dancing of the daughter of Herodias so pleased the king that he promised with an oath to grant whatever she wished. In collusion with her scheming mother, she asked for the head of the Baptist on a charger. Herod, sorry that he had spoken so inadvisedly, reluctantly granted the terrible request. He was caught in a trap and became the victim of an evil woman; a sensual man, he was influenced by a sensuous dance. Sometimes we are tested on what we say; we need always to use our lips wisely so that no one can manipulate our words and bring us into circumstances that we live to regret. 

His confusion was seen when he heard of the miracles of Christ, and was smitten with a bad conscience. He experienced a flashback to his dreadful deed. 

His craftiness was exposed when some Pharisees came to warn the Lord that the king was seeking His life; ‘Go . . . tell that fox’, was the Saviour’s reply, Luke 13. 32. 

His curiosity was unsatisfied when Pilate sent Jesus to Herod, ‘Desirous to see him of a long season . . . he hoped to see some miracle’, Luke 23. 8-9. 

His contempt for Christ was revealed when his men of war, ‘set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate’, Luke 23. 12. 

What a conspiracy of conciliation as, ‘Pilate and Herod were made friends together’; before they were at enmity! 

 

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