Coronavirus Lockdown

During this period of self-isolation, you may wonder how you will cope? No fellowship, no meetings, reduced spiritual food whether for comfort, education or exhortation. What can you do? It can be lonely on your own and you may long for the company and encouragement of others.

We have collected a few links which you can access:

Uplook Ministries: http://uplook.tv/
Denver Gospel Hall: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn42Oz2OY9rXJCgYoadEDjA
Seek the Truth: www.seekthetruth.org.uk
Craig Munro: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRJE6BSE_X013k_yYOCacdA

You can also access these videos plus a whole lot of other helps such as Bible Reading Plans and recorded ministry by downloading the Precious Seed App which is available in both the Android and Apple Stores - follow the links below.

Apple store Google Play

If you are a believer, our prayer is that you will stay safe and be built up in your most holy faith at this difficult time. If you are not a believer, please take the situation seriously and realize that God may be speaking to you through these circumstances.

NB. Please note that we (Precious Seed) do not necessarily agree with everything that is said or believed by the speakers but we are happy to bring these links to you as we are sure that you will find some benefit and blessing from them.

Precious Seed striving to help you in your Christian life

We are a UK registered charity which, primarily, publishes a magazine to encourage the study of the scriptures, the practice of New Testament church principles and interest in gospel work in the UK and abroad. We hope you will find the content of these pages a help in your Christian life. We are constantly adding new content and features to our site, so please revisit periodically to check for updates.

Precious Seed Vol75 No4 Nov2020

Click here to view Issue 4 of 2020

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 27th January

REBEKAH, BRIDE OF THE UNSEEN LOVER

Genesis 25. 19-28; 26. 1-11

Rebekah’s name (fettering, as being captivating by her beauty) is mentioned only thirty times in the Old Testament and once in the New; see Rom. 9. 10. The first occasion outlines her family relationship to Abraham. Abraham had two brothers, Nahor and Haran. Haran had three children: Iscah (according to Josephus, the Jews believed she was Sarah), Lot (who travelled with Abraham to Canaan), and Milcah (who married her uncle Nahor). Milcah and Nahor had eight children, their eighth being Bethuel, father of Rebekah. 

There is no record of her death; her story concludes with her burial in the family crypt at Machpelah, Gen. 49. 31. The other references to her can be grouped into five incidents. 

1. Her betrothal and marriage to Isaac, Gen. 24. Notice some characteristics of Rebekah in this passage. Her servant attitude is seen in not only giving Abraham’s servant a drink, but his camels as well (a thirsty camel on a hot day can consume more than 50 gallons, or 200 litres!). ‘I will draw water for thy camels also, until they have done drinking’, v. 19. Other virtues include her physical beauty and virginity, v. 16; her hospitable spirit, v. 25; and her willingness to yield to God’s will by faith, vv. 50, 58. Her blessing in verse 60 links with Christ’s words in Matthew 16. 18. 

2. The birth of her twins, Esau and Jacob, chapter 25. In answer to Isaac’s prayer, Rebekah conceived. In answer to her prayer in the midst of a difficult pregnancy, the Lord revealed the historic proportions of the struggle within her, vv. 22-23. The wrestling would continue through the chapter, and indeed throughout history between Edomite and Jew. 

3. Her being denied by Isaac in Gerar, ch. 26, reminds us of the warning that, by sinning ourselves, we can set a trap for our children as well, Gen. 12. 13; 20. 2; see Jer. 32. 18. 

4. Her choice of Jacob over Esau and the plot to take the blessing, ch. 27, show the damage done by favouritism; 1 Tim. 5. 21. 

5. Her grief over her Hittite daughters-in-law, 26. 34-35; 27. 46, reminds us that every home has its sorrow, and we do well not to be proud if, at present, our family is doing well. The best Father in the universe has wayward children. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 27th January

REBEKAH, BRIDE OF THE UNSEEN LOVER

Genesis 25. 19-28; 26. 1-11

Rebekah’s name (fettering, as being captivating by her beauty) is mentioned only thirty times in the Old Testament and once in the New; see Rom. 9. 10. The first occasion outlines her family relationship to Abraham. Abraham had two brothers, Nahor and Haran. Haran had three children: Iscah (according to Josephus, the Jews believed she was Sarah), Lot (who travelled with Abraham to Canaan), and Milcah (who married her uncle Nahor). Milcah and Nahor had eight children, their eighth being Bethuel, father of Rebekah. 

There is no record of her death; her story concludes with her burial in the family crypt at Machpelah, Gen. 49. 31. The other references to her can be grouped into five incidents. 

1. Her betrothal and marriage to Isaac, Gen. 24. Notice some characteristics of Rebekah in this passage. Her servant attitude is seen in not only giving Abraham’s servant a drink, but his camels as well (a thirsty camel on a hot day can consume more than 50 gallons, or 200 litres!). ‘I will draw water for thy camels also, until they have done drinking’, v. 19. Other virtues include her physical beauty and virginity, v. 16; her hospitable spirit, v. 25; and her willingness to yield to God’s will by faith, vv. 50, 58. Her blessing in verse 60 links with Christ’s words in Matthew 16. 18. 

2. The birth of her twins, Esau and Jacob, chapter 25. In answer to Isaac’s prayer, Rebekah conceived. In answer to her prayer in the midst of a difficult pregnancy, the Lord revealed the historic proportions of the struggle within her, vv. 22-23. The wrestling would continue through the chapter, and indeed throughout history between Edomite and Jew. 

3. Her being denied by Isaac in Gerar, ch. 26, reminds us of the warning that, by sinning ourselves, we can set a trap for our children as well, Gen. 12. 13; 20. 2; see Jer. 32. 18. 

4. Her choice of Jacob over Esau and the plot to take the blessing, ch. 27, show the damage done by favouritism; 1 Tim. 5. 21. 

5. Her grief over her Hittite daughters-in-law, 26. 34-35; 27. 46, reminds us that every home has its sorrow, and we do well not to be proud if, at present, our family is doing well. The best Father in the universe has wayward children. 

 

Daily Thought

Daily Thought for: 27th January

REBEKAH, BRIDE OF THE UNSEEN LOVER

Genesis 25. 19-28; 26. 1-11

Rebekah’s name (fettering, as being captivating by her beauty) is mentioned only thirty times in the Old Testament and once in the New; see Rom. 9. 10. The first occasion outlines her family relationship to Abraham. Abraham had two brothers, Nahor and Haran. Haran had three children: Iscah (according to Josephus, the Jews believed she was Sarah), Lot (who travelled with Abraham to Canaan), and Milcah (who married her uncle Nahor). Milcah and Nahor had eight children, their eighth being Bethuel, father of Rebekah. 

There is no record of her death; her story concludes with her burial in the family crypt at Machpelah, Gen. 49. 31. The other references to her can be grouped into five incidents. 

1. Her betrothal and marriage to Isaac, Gen. 24. Notice some characteristics of Rebekah in this passage. Her servant attitude is seen in not only giving Abraham’s servant a drink, but his camels as well (a thirsty camel on a hot day can consume more than 50 gallons, or 200 litres!). ‘I will draw water for thy camels also, until they have done drinking’, v. 19. Other virtues include her physical beauty and virginity, v. 16; her hospitable spirit, v. 25; and her willingness to yield to God’s will by faith, vv. 50, 58. Her blessing in verse 60 links with Christ’s words in Matthew 16. 18. 

2. The birth of her twins, Esau and Jacob, chapter 25. In answer to Isaac’s prayer, Rebekah conceived. In answer to her prayer in the midst of a difficult pregnancy, the Lord revealed the historic proportions of the struggle within her, vv. 22-23. The wrestling would continue through the chapter, and indeed throughout history between Edomite and Jew. 

3. Her being denied by Isaac in Gerar, ch. 26, reminds us of the warning that, by sinning ourselves, we can set a trap for our children as well, Gen. 12. 13; 20. 2; see Jer. 32. 18. 

4. Her choice of Jacob over Esau and the plot to take the blessing, ch. 27, show the damage done by favouritism; 1 Tim. 5. 21. 

5. Her grief over her Hittite daughters-in-law, 26. 34-35; 27. 46, reminds us that every home has its sorrow, and we do well not to be proud if, at present, our family is doing well. The best Father in the universe has wayward children. 

 

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